MADAME YEVONDE

(1893-1975)

Madame Yevonde was a pioneer in photographic techniques, experimenting with solarisation and associated particularly with the development of the now-defunct Vivex process. She began a photography apprenticeship with portrait photographer Lallie Charles (1869-1919) and set up her own studio at 92 Victoria Street London in 1914. Her popularity by 1921 enabled her to move to a larger studio at 100 Victoria Street. Her experimental colour photography began in the early 1930s, and she took up advertising work as well as her portraits, once again moving to 28 Berkeley Square in 1933.

'La Belle Dame Sans Merci'. Tearsheet from Photograms of the Year, 1920s

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British novelist Lady Dorothy Mills (1889-1959), 1921

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Portrait of soldier Captain Leslie St. Clair Cheape (1882-1916) who was killed in action on the 23rd of April 1916 and was also dubbed ‘England’s Greatest Polo Player’. Photograph by Madame Yevonde at her studio at 92 Victoria Street, London.

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'La Belle Dame Sans Merci'. Tearsheet from Photograms of the Year, 1920s

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